2001: The Book, The Movie, And Kubrick’s Unused Aliens.

The Unused Concepts for Kubrick’s 2001: A Space Odyssey

Klockwork Kugler: This is my blog. This is what I do.

So I just finished re-reading Arthur C. Clarke’s 2001: A Space Odyssey, one of my absolute favorite books.  And before I inevitably sit down to re-watch Stanley Kurbick’s 2001: A Space Odyssey (my absolute favorite movie) I thought I’d share some thoughts on the masterpiece.  Now, when I say “masterpiece” there may be some of you who wonder “whose masterpiece?”   Both film and book are often designated their respective creator’s “masterpiece” so which came first?  Was the movie an adaptation of the book?  Or was the book an adaptation of the movie?  The answer is neither.

2001 was the creative collaboration of two artists, each a master of their craft.  Sometime in the mid 1960s, Kubrick approached Clarke with the intent of making, what he joked, “the proverbial good science fiction movie”.  Clarke suggested adapting a few of his short stories, most notably “The Sentinel.”  Together, over the course…

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The Lost Bond Novel – ‘Per Fine Ounce’ by Geoffrey Jenkins

Artistic Licence Renewed

literary_per_fine_ounce_lettersFleming had been planning to write a 15th 007 novel, to follow “The Man With The Golden Gun” and he sought assistance from his old friend Geoffrey Jenkins who would be able to advise Fleming about the setting for his latest novel: South Africa.

Of the author, Fleming once said:

“Geoffrey Jenkins has the supreme gift of originality. A Twist of Sand is a literate, imaginative first novel in the tradition of high and original adventure.”

Ian Fleming would never write that novel and it is considered the “most famous unpublished book in the world,”

Jenkins was approached by Glidrose Publications (now Ian Fleming Publications) to write a James Bond continuation novel, using the source material he had gathered for Fleming. After a drawn-out period in which Ann Fleming considered and eventually granted permission for Jenkins to take over 007 in ink, the author penned a manuscript. This was…

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Unproduced Ernest Films (1985 – 1994)

In the annals of 80's/90's family audience entertainers, one of the most common facets, especially in the regional southern markets, was Ernest P. Worrell, the know-nothing know-it-all created by Nashville advertising executive and director John R. Cherry III and brought to life by the spastic, rubber faced Shakespearean trained Lexington character actor, Jim Varney. Sort … Continue reading Unproduced Ernest Films (1985 – 1994)

“Miraculous Ladybug” [Partially Animated Original Concept; 2004-2012]

In 2004, French artist Thomas Astruc (who'd been a storyboard artist on programs such as W.I.T.C.H. and Totally Spies) encountered a female artist with a ladybug illustration on her shirt. This provided the inspiration for an idea about a Franco-Chinese girl named Marietta Cheng who was, by night,the superheroine, Ladybug the Mini-Menace, fighting crime in … Continue reading “Miraculous Ladybug” [Partially Animated Original Concept; 2004-2012]

Best Movies Never Made — “Giraffes on Horseback Salads”

A look at the never made surrealist collaboration between The Marx Brothers and Salvador Dali.

Gabriel Diego Valdez

Marx Bros lead

by Gabe Valdez

The Marx Brothers. Salvador Dali.

Roll the idea around in your head for a moment. The Brothers who lived on precision in their wordsmanship and comedic timing, written and directed by the man whose entire art movement was based on erasing the connective tissue that linked moments and plots together.

BACKGROUND – THE MARX BROTHERS

It would have been a conjunction of worldwide talents like none other. The Marx Brothers were the pre-eminent comedians of their time. Brothers in real life, and veteran vaudeville performers, between 1929 and 1949 they made 13 full-length comedies together. Five of those films are on the AFI’s Top 100 Comedies list. Duck Soup and A Night at the Opera are both in the top 12.

They involved a unique blend of high wit, social satire, and base slapstick. Groucho was the wit, always ready with a plot and a one liner…

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Stanley Kubrick’s “Napoleon” (1967- 1973; unproduced)

https://dwendt212.wordpress.com/2016/04/12/stanley-kubricks-lost-napoleon-one-of-films-greatest-what-ifs/ http://nofilmschool.com/2013/05/kubricks-napoleon-screenplay

“Noble Rot” (1982; Unproduced)

By Late 1981, 32 year old John Adam Belushi was already an acclaimed renaissance man. He had already conquered three whole facets of entertainment. He had formerly been a featured player on the number one rated television show, NBC's sketch comedy series, "Saturday Night Live", had been the breakout character "Bluto" Blutarski in the number … Continue reading “Noble Rot” (1982; Unproduced)

“Shrek!” Chris Farley Version (1997; Partially Recorded)

In 1990, magazine cartoonist, William Steig published an original "fractured fairy tale" children's book, "Shrek!". The story told the tale of a vile, ugly teenaged ogre who is (literally) kicked out of his Parents' den and told to make a living for himself, scaring people. Shrek sets out to go off on an adventure, joined … Continue reading “Shrek!” Chris Farley Version (1997; Partially Recorded)